Definitions Of Claims On Food Labels

Definitions Of Claims On Food Labels

The following definitions will help you, when reading nutrition labels, to understand exactly what is in the foods your are buying for your family: Free – the product contains no or only a trivial amount of one or more of the following: fat, saturated fat, cholesterol, sodium, sugars, and calories.

Calorie free – fewer than 5 calories per serving

Cholesterol free – less than 2 mg of cholesterol & 2 g or less of saturated fat per serving

Fat free – less than 0.5 g per serving .

Sodium free – less than 5 mg of sodium per serving Low – this means a large quantity of the food can be eaten without exceeding the Recommended Dietary Value for the nutrient

Sugar free – less than 0.5 g per serving

. Low calorie – contains 40 calories or less in a serving

Low cholesterol – 20 mg or less and 2 g or less of saturated fat per serving

Low fat – contains 3 g or less per serving

Low saturated fat – contains 1 g or less per serving

Low sodium – contains 140 mg or less per serving

Very low sodium – contains 35 mg or less per serving

Lean – used in the description of the fat content of meat, poultry, seafood, and game meats. Less than 10 g fat, 4.5g or less saturated fat, and less than 95 mg cholesterol per serving for every 100 g of product .

Extra Lean – less than 5 g fat, less than 2 g saturated fat, and less than 95 mg cholesterol per serving for every 100 g of product.

Good source – this means that one serving has 10 to 19 percent of the RDA for a particular nutrient.

High – used when food contains 20% or more of the RDA for a nutrient in one serving.

Light – this term can mean two things:
a.) A nutritionally altered product has 1/3 fewer calories or 1/2 the fat of the referenced food
b.) The sodium content of a low calorie, low-fat food has been decreased by 50%

Less – a food, altered or not, contains 25% less of a nutrient or of calories than the referenced food.

More – a serving contains a nutrient that is at least 10% of the Daily Value more than the referenced food. This term also applies to “fortified”, “enriched”, and “added”,when the food has been altered.

Percent fat free – the product with this claim must be low-fat or fat-free. It reflects the amount of fat in 100 grams of the product. For example: 95% fat free would have 5 g fat for every 100 g of product.

Reduced – The nutritionally altered product has 25% less of a nutrient or of calories than the regular, or referenced, product.